Cora Ball

The single biggest pollution problem facing our ocean is microfiber: trillions of pieces of tiny fibers flowing into the ocean – every time we use our washing machines. Our clothing is breaking up, sending this microfiber (made of plastic and chemical-covered non-plastics) out with the drain water – just one fleece jacket could shed up to 250,000 pieces per garment per wash [source]. New York City, alone, could have 6.8 billion microfibers flowing into its harbor every day. We are all contributing to this problem.

Every time we do laundry, our clothes shed tiny microfibers, which go down the drains of our washing machines, through wastewater treatment facilities and into our waterways.

Everyone who wears and washes clothes is part of this pollution. Everyone who eats or breathes could suffer the consequences. Learn more about the problem of microfiber pollution here.

HOW THE CORA BALL WORKS

Most washing machines do not have filters. The ones that do are only good at keeping keys and coins from clogging your pipes. A standard filter cannot do what needs to be done: catch fibers too small for the human eye to see and allow water flow.

So, we turned to nature. Coral does exactly what we need; it catches tiny things from flowing water. Using those same principles in the design of the Cora Ball, you can now just drop, or throw it into your washing machine and do your wash as usual. It is easy to use and easy to clean.

Cora Ball swooshes around in the laundry and just like coral, allows water to flow, while picking up those little pieces of microfiber and catching them in her stalks. Independent tests investigating the effectiveness of the Cora Ball out of Dr. Chelsea Rochman’s lab at the University of Toronto (McIlwraith 2019) and University of Plymouth (Napper 2020) showed the Cora Ball prevents 26% and 31% of microfibers from flowing down the drain respectively. Furthermore, in Napper 2020, the researcher’s determined that the Cora Ball helped reduce overall shedding in addition to collecting microfiber that is being shed.